<i>Plasmodium vivax</i> Parasite Load Is Associated With Histopathology in <i>Saimiri boliviensis</i> With Findings Comparable to <i>P vivax</i> Pathogenesis in Humans.

19 Jan 2019
Peterson MS, Joyner CJ, Cordy RJ, Salinas JL, Machiah D, Lapp SA, MaHPIC Consortium., Meyer EVS, Gumber S, Galinski MR

Background

can cause severe malaria with multisystem organ dysfunction and death. Clinical reports suggest that parasite accumulation in tissues may contribute to pathogenesis and disease severity, but direct evidence is scarce.

Methods

We present quantitative parasitological and histopathological analyses of tissue sections from a cohort of naive, mostly splenectomized infected with to define the relationship of tissue parasite load and histopathology.

Results

The lung, liver, and kidney showed the most tissue injury, with pathological presentations similar to observations reported from autopsies. Parasite loads correlated with the degree of histopathologic changes in the lung and liver tissues. In contrast, kidney damage was not associated directly with parasite load but with the presence of hemozoin, an inflammatory parasite byproduct.

Conclusions

This analysis supports the use of the infection model for performing detailed histopathological studies to better understand and potentially design interventions to treat serious clinical manifestations caused by .